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#7

Your friend tells you that they feel disappointed by marriage. They thought it would improve their happiness, but life seems just as hard as ever. How do you respond?

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  • You suggest they spend more time with their spouse. Prioritizing the marriage will help!

  • I suggest they spend time alone and with their partner coming up with things that feel fulfilling and valuable to make their life more like what they imagined.

  • If their partner isn’t bringing them happiness, then they have to break it off immediately.

  • I remind them that their happiness is their own responsibility, and they can’t rely on another person to make it happen. They can talk to their spouse about how their feeling, but ultimately they’re responsible for their own happiness.

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#8

For long term success, which of these do you think is the most important in a relationship?

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  • Trust

  • Communication

  • Chemistry

  • Common values

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#9

You run into a couple that has just gotten engaged, but one partner is Jewish and one is Christian, each with strong beliefs. How do you help them bridge the gap?

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  • I suggest that one partner converts to the other’s religion.

  • As long as their core values around children, marriage, loyalty, work, etc. are the same, they should focus on those and try to see the similarities rather than the differences.

  • They should pick one religion to raise their kids in and not talk about it otherwise.

  • They should deal with it now because it will become a problem down the road.

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#10

You find out that your partner has a long term, chronic illness. How do you approach facing the problem?

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  • I promise that I’ll be there for whatever they need and support them through the problem, 100%.

  • I know that we’re a partnership and we’ll approach it together, but I also remember that I have to balance my own needs with theirs. They need a robust support system.

  • I try to be honest with them about how much I can reasonably support them. We may not be a good fit.

  • I treat them just how I always did. They’re the same person after all.

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#11

Your best friends are about to get married. Which of these things do you expect them to have talked about before they tie the knot?

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  • Kids

  • Long-term career goals

  • Sex

  • All of the above

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#12

William says he and his partner aren't having sex as much anymore, and he feels unwanted and lonely. What do you recommend?

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  • I’d suggest they focus less on “sex” and more on intimacy. What are other ways they can feel close? Touch can be a variety of things, and when you’re comfortable and close to your partner, sex will come more naturally.

  • I recommend seeing a doctor to make sure there aren’t any physical issues.

  • William should surprise his partner with a clean house, beautiful meal, and stress-free zone to put them in the mood.

  • He should suggest opening up the relationship.

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